Public Speaking – Example of a Persuasive Speech Outline to Prove That Something is True

One form of persuasive speaking is when you want to prove that something is – or is not – TRUE. There is also when you want your audience to DO something and when you want to sway them to your point of VIEW. Hence, the DO, TRUE and VIEW forms of persuasion.

Being persuasive requires different considerations than informative speaking, and one of them is how you organize your ideas. Your particular objective determines the best organization. You still have the three parts of a speech – the intro, body, and conclusion. But in the TRUE method, the Main Points in the Body of your talk would consist of some combination of any or all of these three items: (1) personal observation or experience, (2) evidence, (3) expert testimony.

To see how this organization would work when you want to prove to your audience that something is (or is not) TRUE, let’s create a hypothetical objective. Suppose you’re talking to a group of people who want to go on a diet. You’ve recommended the “Skinny Minny” system. But some members of the group have questioned whether that particular diet really works. You want to prove to them that it is TRUE that they can lose weight on this diet. Here’s how you might outline that presentation:

I. INTRO

A. HOOK: Start with something attention-getting. Maybe it could be a startling statistic or revelation: “Eighty percent of all people who lose weight on a diet gain it back within a year.”

B. REASON TO LISTEN: “To lose weight effectively and keep it off, you need to follow a program that allows you to control cravings and make smart eating choices without having to count calories. The problem is, how do you know which diet will do that and not just be another fad leaving you hungry or with the lost pounds returning a year later? There is an answer.”

II. BODY

A. ROAD MAP: The Skinny Minny System is an effective eating program that will enable you to lose pounds slowly but permanently and keep the weight off simply by changing some of your eating choices. Let me show you the proof that it works.

B. MAIN POINTS:

1. EVIDENCE

Present research results, studies or other data that support your claim. In proving this diet’s integrity, you might present health and nutrition studies that document this plan’s success with weight loss. You could cite surveys of people who took weight off and kept it off over several years.

2. PERSONAL OBSERVATION

Something you’ve seen or experienced personally can be very compelling. You could tell your own story of how, on this program, you shed pounds, dropped several clothing sizes, and have kept the weight off.

3. EXPERT TESTIMONY

A validation of your claim by other people who are acknowledged as experts can build your case. You could cite testimonials from doctors and nutritionists extolling the results of this plan and its health benefits. You would also probably cite, complete with before and after photos, the testimony of others who have lost and kept off the weight.

III. CONCLUSION

A. SUMMARY: Wrap up with reviewing the proof-the research, the personal success stories, the expert validation-that supports your claim about the Skinny Minny’s success at weight loss.

B. CLOSE/CALL TO ACTION: “I hope you’ve been able to see the proof of Skinny Minny’s results. If you change the way you eat, you’ll change the way you look and feel. So just give it a try. Sign up for just one month and see if you don’t look and feel different after 30 days.”

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Barbara_Busey

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